E-Learning
Main Content

e-Learning for Educators
Course Information



Early Childhood Book Reading Practices**
 
Course Description
    

Book reading in the early childhood classroom is not only one of the most important practices for building later reading success, but it is probably one of the more enjoyable experiences for both teachers and children. In this workshop early childhood educators will explore quality children’s literature and best book reading practices. Participants will learn ways to share various genres of books in the classroom. They will learn the importance of multiple re-readings and strategies to foster children’s vocabulary knowledge, print concepts, phonological awareness, and reading comprehension during large and small group readings. Workshop assignments will invite participants to research quality children’s literature and develop book reading planners with specific goals for children’s learning.

**This course has been designed for individuals who are currently teaching/certified to teach children in Pre-K-Grade 3.

 
Course Syllabus
    

Book reading in the early childhood classroom is not only one of the most important practices for building later reading success, but it is probably one of the more enjoyable experiences for both teachers and children. In this workshop early childhood educators will explore quality children’s literature and best book reading practices. Participants will learn ways to share various genres of books in the classroom. They will learn the importance of multiple re-readings and strategies to foster children’s vocabulary knowledge, print concepts, phonological awareness, and reading comprehension during large and small group readings. Workshop assignments will invite participants to research quality children’s literature and develop book reading planners with specific goals for children’s learning. 

Goals and Objectives

This workshop will enable participants to:

Understand how book reading impacts children’s language and literacy development;

Learn effective strategies for utilizing different book genres in the classroom;

Understand how multiple readings of the same book can enhance children’s cognitive and literacy skills;

Learn how to implement interactive book reading sessions that deepen children’s comprehension;

Learn ways to support vocabulary development through book reading;

Learn ways to integrate books and book reading into classroom curriculum activities.

Audience

This course provides early childhood educators an understanding of strategies to share various genres of books in the classroom and of the importance of multiple re-readings and strategies to foster children’s vocabulary knowledge, print concepts, phonological awareness, and reading comprehension during large and small group readings. Participants are expected to have regular access to computers and proficiency with email and current Web browsers.

Workshop Details

This workshop is divided into seven one-week sessions: an Orientation, and six content-based sessions. Each content session includes readings, activities and an online discussion among workshop participants. The time for completing each content session is estimated to be between 6.5 to 7 hours.

Session one

Effective Read-Aloud Practices.

Session two

The Classroom Book Area.

Session three

Getting the Most Out of Nonfiction Books.

Session four

The Importance of Multiple Readings.

Session five

Vocabulary through Book Reading.

Session six

Putting it All Together.


Certificate of Completion and Graduate Credit

Upon successful completion of this course, Early Childhood Book Reading Practices, participants will receive a Certificate of Completion documenting successful completion of the course requirements. Certificates are distributed to each qualifying participant via attachment to the Session Six Dropbox shortly after the completion of the course.  

Participants in this course are eligible to receive non-degree graduate credits from either West Virginia University, Concord University, Marshall University or West Virginia State University. Credits will be awarded at the end of the semester in which the course occurs. Additional information is available on the course News/Welcome Page.

Assessment

Specific questions about assessment, expectations, or requirements should be directed to the facilitator of this workshop.

The following criteria will be used to determine successful completion of this workshop:

Score of 90% or above on the Orientation Quiz,

Participation in all session discussion forums,

Completion of the workshop’s final project, submitted to the dropbox(es) for facilitator evaluation and posted in the appropriate discussion forum(s), and

Completion of the orientation and final workshop surveys.

Orientation Quiz
During the Orientation Session, participants will complete an Orientation Quiz. The quiz may be taken as many times as necessary to obtain the required score of at least 90%.

Discussion Participation
Participants are required to post a minimum of three substantial postings, including one that begins a new thread and at least two that respond to an existing thread, in all session discussion forums.

Participants will be evaluated on the frequency and quality of their discussion board participation. Postings that begin new threads will be reviewed based on their relevance, demonstrated understanding of course concepts, examples cited, and overall quality. Original postings are to be made by Sunday night. By Monday night, is is expected that participants respond to at least two colleagues' original postings in a respectful, professional manner, making sure to extend or expand the conversation by adding new ideas or examples. Postings that respond to other participants will be evaluated on relevance, degree to which they extend the discussion, and tone. 
 
Participants are to read all the original messages and at least half (50%) of the total messages posted for each session by Tuesday night. During Session Three and Six, participants will be asked to peer review other colleagues' projects in the Discussions using PQP and the Project Rubric.

Workshop Activities
Participants are expected to complete the workshop readings and activities as posted in each of the session assignment pages. Activities may include exploring websites related to workshop content, watching online video clips, using specific technology applications, solving problems, and working on the final project. 

Final Project
As a final project for this workshop, participants will create a curriculum unit for classroom use that incorporates a topic covered in each session of this workshop. Participants are expected to work independently on the final project throughout the workshop using the FInal Project Template, and should submit the project to the facilitator during Sessions Three and Six of this workshop. The Project Rubric prior contains criteria by which the final project will be evaluated. Please reference this rubric prior to beginning work on the final project. In addition, participants will submit their project to the Discussion Forum during Sessions Three and Six for PQP.

Participants are expected to work independently on the final project throughout the workshop, and should submit a completed final project to the facilitator before the end of the final session of this workshop. Copyright guidelines are to be observed throughout the course project and all course activities. All work associated with the course project is to be the original work of the course participant. Fair Use does not apply to the course project.

Workshop Surveys
Participants are expected to complete an Orientation Survey by Sunday of the Orientation Session.  A Final Survey is to be taken by Sunday of Session Six.

Grades
All grades in the course gradebook must be a "C" for successful course completion. A grade of "C" indicates that all work has been completed and the work meets the expectations for that assignment.

Standards
Alignment with the Standards for English Language Arts from the National Council for Teachers of English (NCTE) and International Reading Association (IRA)

Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

 The WV NxG CSOs for English Language Arts will be referenced in the course project. 

About this Workshop

This course was developed by EdTech Leaders Online (http://edtechleaders.org) at Education Development Center. EdTech Leaders Online provides capacity building training and online courses for school districts, state departments of education, and colleges and universities.

This workshop was developed in partnership with Alabama Public Television (http://www.aptv.org/), and the e-Learning for Educators project, funded by a US Department of Education Ready to Teach grant.

This course cannot be copied or modified without written permission of EDC.

Last update: August 2010

© 2011 Education Development Center, Inc., through its project, EdTech Leaders® Online, http://www.edtechleaders.org. All rights reserved.