E-Learning
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e-Learning for Educators
Course Information



Finding the Best Education Resources on the Web**
 
Course Description
    

With an abundance of information easily available on the Internet, teaching students to be critical locators, assessors, readers, and contributors of online content helps students develop 21st century skills. Integrating high-quality Internet resources in the classroom is an important part of teaching these skills. While many rich resources are available, they are only useful if educators can find them. Today, a search engine is only part of the toolset; Web 2.0 tools like blogs, microblogs, and social bookmarking enable us to find the best resources from other people. Participants in this workshop will explore the range of educational material available on the Internet and develop a varied approach that uses both computer and human networks to find these resources. This approach not only allows educators to find better and more diverse resources, but also saves time. As a context for integrating these resources more effectively, participants will explore several teaching strategies for better digital media literacy. Participants will leave the workshop with an emerging personal learning network (PLN) that they may continue to nurture and a collection of web resources appropriate for their classroom use.

*Participants must be currently employed as a WV classroom teacher, school counselor or have had classroom teaching experience as a certified teacher/educator.

 
Course Syllabus
    

With an abundance of information easily available on the Internet, teaching students to be critical locators, assessors, readers, and contributors of online content helps students develop 21st century skills. Integrating high-quality Internet resources in the classroom is an important part of teaching these skills. While many rich resources are available, they are only useful if educators can find them. Today, a search engine is only part of the toolset; Web 2.0 tools like blogs, microblogs, and social bookmarking enable us to find the best resources from other people. Participants in this workshop will explore the range of educational material available on the Internet and develop a varied approach that uses both computer and human networks to find these resources. This approach not only allows educators to find better and more diverse resources, but also saves time. As a context for integrating these resources more effectively, participants will explore several teaching strategies for better digital media literacy. Participants will leave the workshop with an emerging personal learning network (PLN) that they may continue to nurture and a collection of web resources appropriate for their classroom use.

Goals and Objectives

During this course, participants will learn skills and strategies to:

Integrate web-based resources to promote digital media literacy;

Use social bookmarking and other Web 2.0 tools to locate and organize web-based resources;

Use Google and other search tools more effectively;

Explore how visual search tools can support the Universal Design for Learning framework (UDL);

Find and integrate digital images across content areas; and

Create and share a list of outstanding web-based resources.

Audience

This workshop is intended for teachers of grades K-12, technology specialists, curriculum specialists, and professional development specialists. Participants are expected to have regular access to computers and be proficient with email and web-browsing. Participants are highly encouraged to use Firefox, Safari, Google Chrome or Internet Explorer.

Course Structure

This course is divided into seven one-week sessions: an Orientation and six content-based sessions. Each content session includes readings, activities, and an online discussion among course participants. The time for completing each content session is estimated to be between four and five hours and the total amount of time required for the entire course is estimated to be 30 hours.

Session One

    Promoting Digital Media Literacy

Session Two

    Using Your Personal Learning Network (PLN)

Session Three

    Better Searching with Google

Session Four

    Visually Exploring Information

Session Five

    Finding and Teaching with Digital Images

Session Six

    Web 2.0 Tools for Creating and Sharing Knowledge on the Web


Assessment

Discussion Participation
Participants are required to post a minimum of three substantial postings, including one that begins a new thread and at least two that respond to an existing thread, in all session discussion forums.

Participants will be evaluated on the frequency and quality of their discussion board participation. Postings will be reviewed based on their relevance, demonstrated understanding of course concepts, examples cited, overall quality, degree to which they extend the discussion, and tone. These criteria are described more fully in the Discussion Board Expectations.

Course Activities
Participants are expected to complete the workshop readings and activities as posted in each of the session assignment pages. Activities may include exploring websites related to workshop content, watching online video clips, using specific technology applications, solving problems, and working on the final project.

Final Project
As a final project, participants will create an annotated list of the ten best web-based resources to use in their classrooms using the web curation tool of their choice and they will reflect on their process for finding these resources. Participants are expected to work independently on the final project throughout the course. They will share their annotated lists at the end of the course as a strategy for collaborating with colleagues to locate the best resources. Each participant is expected to submit a completed final project to the facilitator by the end of the final session of this course. There will be three times during the course when this information is submitted: At the end of Session One, At the end of Session Three and ant the end of Session Six. A course project planning form and course project rubric guide the final project development.

Course Surveys
Participants are expected to complete an orientation survey before the end of Session One of the workshop, and a Final Survey during the final workshop session.

Resources
All of the resources in the course are to be saved to a list on the social bookmarking tool, Diigo. Each resource has been tagged with the session number as well as key words so you can easily locate resources and access the collection of resources contained in this course after it is over. 

Certificate Of Completion

Upon successful completion of this course, Differentiating Instruction, participants will receive a Certificate of Completion documenting successful completion of the course requirements. Certificates are distributed to each qualifying participant by attachment to the Session Six Dropbox shortly after the completion of the course.

Graduate Credit Information

Participants in this course are eligible to receive non-degree graduate credits from either West Virginia University, Marshall University, Concord University or West Virginia State University. Credits will be awarded at the end of the semester in which the course occurs. Additional information is available on the course News/Welcome Page

Standards

This workshop meets the standards for Content, Instructional Design, and Technology as defined in the National Standards of Quality for Online Courses, published by the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL).

About this Course

This workshop was developed by EdTech Leaders Online at Education Development Center (EDC). EdTech Leaders Online provides capacity building online training, and online courses for school districts, state departments of education, and colleges and universities.

Last update: July 2014

© 2015 Education Development Center, Inc., through its project, EdTech Leaders® Online, http://www.edtechleaders.org. All rights reserved.