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Fruit & Veggie Guidelines
Birth - 11 Months

Click to download a handy quick reference sheet for the fruit and vegetable guidelines. (pdf)

Age goRecommended stopNot Recommended
0 - 3 months Breast milk (preferred)

Iron-fortified infant formula
Other foods at this age
4 - 7 months A variety of different fruits and or vegetables may be offered. All fruits and vegetables should be mashed, strained, or pureed to prevent choking.

Fruits and vegetables should be served plain, without added fat, honey, sugar, or salt at this age.

Some examples include:
  • Commercially prepared baby fruits
  • Commercially prepared baby vegetables
  • Fresh or frozen fruits
  • Fresh or frozen vegetables
  • Canned fruits (in their natural juices and water)
  • Canned vegetables with no added sodium
Added fat, honey, sugar, or salt to fruits and vegetables

100% fruit and vegetable juices until 12 months of age

Fruit-based drinks with added sweeteners

Food or drink other than breast milk and/or formula in a bottle unless medically necessary

Pre-mixed commercially prepared fruits with more than one food item

Pre-mixed commercially prepared vegetables with more than one food item

Fried vegetables and fried fruits

The following fruits and vegetables are a choking hazard to children under 12 months:
  • Dried fruit and vegetables
  • Raw vegetables
  • Cooked or raw whole corn kernels
  • Hard pieces of raw fruit such as apple, pear, or melon
  • Whole grapes, berries, cherries, melon balls, or cherry or grape tomatoes
8 - 11 months A variety of different fruits and/or vegetables may be offered.

All fruits should be cooked if needed and/or cut into bite-size pieces to prevent choking.

All vegetables should be cut into bite-size pieces and cooked to prevent choking. Corn, specifically, should be pureed and cooked before serving.

Fruits and vegetables should be served plain, with no added fat, honey, sugar or salt.

Some examples include:
  • Fresh or frozen fruits
  • Fresh or frozen vegetables
  • Canned fruits (in their natural juices or water)
  • Canned vegetables with no added sodium


Portion Size

Age Item Meals
4 - 7 months Fruits and/or vegetables 0-3 Tbsp
8 - 11 months Fruits and/or vegetables 1-4 Tbsp


Rationale

Why are fruits and vegetables important?
  • The Dietary Guidelines for Americans encourage consumption of a variety of fruits and vegetables daily.
  • Fruits and vegetables provide essential vitamins and minerals, fiber, and other substances that may protect against many chronic diseases.
  • They are high in fiber.
  • They help children feel fuller longer.
  • They provide children with the opportunity to learn about different textures, colors, and tastes.
  • They help children potentially develop life-long healthy eating habits.

Why no commercially prepared fruits and/or vegetables mixtures?
  • Portions of the food components in the mixture are not specified.
  • Mixture may contain a new food that the child has not tried and may cause allergic reaction.